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Cardiac Structural Defects Abstract Alert -- September 11 - 23, 2007, Vol. 1, No. 7

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Table of Contents
  • Your Company Name
    • Your Product Name & Your Company
  • AGA Medical
  • Cardia
    • Intrasept PFO Closure System & Cardia
    • Intrasept ASD Closure System & Cardia
  • NMT Medical
    • STARFlex & NMT
    • CardioSEAL & NMT
    • BioSTAR & NMT
  • St Jude Medical
    • Premere PFO Closure System & St Jude
  • Atrial Septal Defect (ASD) (3)
    • NMT Medical & ASD
    • STARFlex & ASD
    • CardioSEAL & ASD
    • BioSTAR & ASD
    • AGA Medical & ASD
    • Amplatzer & ASD
    • Amplatzer Septal Occluder & ASD
    • Cardia & ASD
    • Intrasept & ASD
    • St Jude Medical & ASD
    • Premere PFO Closure System & ASD
    • Closure & ASD
  • Left Atrial Appendage (2)
    • AGA Medical & LA Appendage
    • Amplatzer Vascular Plug & LA Appendage
    • Aritech & LA Appendage
    • Watchman Device & LA Appendage
    • Closure & LA Appendage
  • Patent Foramen Ovale (PFO) (2)
    • NMT Medical & PFO
    • STARFlex & PFO
    • BioSTAR & PFO
    • CardioSEAL & PFO
    • AGA Medical & PFO
    • Amplatzer & PFO
    • Amplatzer Septal Occluder & PFO
    • Amplatzer PFO Occluder & PFO
    • Cardia & PFO
    • Intrasept & PFO
    • St Jude Medical & PFO
    • Premere PFO Closure System & PFO
    • Closure & PFO
  • Stroke & Migraine
  • Ventricular Septal Defect (VSD) (3)
    • NMT Medical & VSD
    • STARFlex & VSD
    • CardioSEAL & VSD
    • AGA Medical & VSD
    • Amplatzer & VSD
    • Amplatzer Septal Occluder & VSD (1)
    • Amplatzer PFO Occluder & VSD
    • Cardia & VSD
    • Intrasept & VSD
    • Closure & VSD
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Archived Abstracts
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Summary

Your Company Name
Your Product Name & Your Company
AGA Medical
Amplatzer Septal Occluder & AGA
Abstract Title Lead Author Publication Pub Date
Cardiology; Study data from the United States shed light on cardiology research [none given] Life Science Weekly 2007-09-18
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Amplatzer PFO Occluder & AGA
Cardia
Intrasept PFO Closure System & Cardia
Intrasept ASD Closure System & Cardia
NMT Medical
STARFlex & NMT
CardioSEAL & NMT
BioSTAR & NMT
St Jude Medical
Premere PFO Closure System & St Jude
Atrial Septal Defect (ASD)
Abstract Title Lead Author Publication Pub Date
Total endoscopic repair of a pediatric atrial septal defect using the da Vinci robot and hypothermic fibrillation. Baird CW Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg 2007-09-12
Findings from Scotland, Italy and the United States broaden understanding of angiology Zimarino, M Health & Medicine Week. 2007-09-17
Study findings from Emory University, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery broaden understanding of atrioventricular septal defect in children [none given] Biotech Law Weekly 2007-09-21
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NMT Medical & ASD
STARFlex & ASD
CardioSEAL & ASD
BioSTAR & ASD
AGA Medical & ASD
Amplatzer & ASD
Amplatzer Septal Occluder & ASD
Cardia & ASD
Intrasept & ASD
St Jude Medical & ASD
Premere PFO Closure System & ASD
Closure & ASD
Left Atrial Appendage
Abstract Title Lead Author Publication Pub Date
New echocardiography study results from T. Mráz et al described [none given] Medical Imaging Business Week 2007-09-13
New cardiology study results from Australia, Germany and the United States described [none given] Hospital Business Week 2007-09-23
Return to Top
AGA Medical & LA Appendage
Amplatzer Vascular Plug & LA Appendage
Aritech & LA Appendage
Watchman Device & LA Appendage
Closure & LA Appendage
Patent Foramen Ovale (PFO)
Abstract Title Lead Author Publication Pub Date
Frequency and Significance of Cardiac Sources of Embolism in the TOAST Classification. Han SW Cerebrovasc Dis. 2007-09-19
Data on fibrinolysis published by researchers at University Autonoma of Barcelona, Department of Neurology [none given] Biotech Business Week 2007-09-17
Return to Top
NMT Medical & PFO
STARFlex & PFO
BioSTAR & PFO
CardioSEAL & PFO
AGA Medical & PFO
Amplatzer & PFO
Amplatzer Septal Occluder & PFO
Amplatzer PFO Occluder & PFO
Cardia & PFO
Intrasept & PFO
St Jude Medical & PFO
Premere PFO Closure System & PFO
Closure & PFO
Stroke & Migraine
Ventricular Septal Defect (VSD)
Abstract Title Lead Author Publication Pub Date
Studies from I. Biyik et al have provided new data on ventricular septal defects [none given] Cardiovascular Week 2007-09-17
Researchers from GlaxoSmithKline provide details of new studies and findings in the area of congenital heart defects [none given] Lab Law Weekly 2007-09-21
Severe Ebstein's Anomaly Can Benefit From a Small Ventricular Septal Defect: Two Cases. Del Pasqua A Pediatr Cardiol 2007-09-14
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NMT Medical & VSD
STARFlex & VSD
CardioSEAL & VSD
AGA Medical & VSD
Amplatzer & VSD
Amplatzer Septal Occluder & VSD
Abstract Title Lead Author Publication Pub Date
Transcatheter closure of perimembranous ventricular septal defects: early and long-term results. Butera G J Am Coll Cardiol 2007-09-18
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Amplatzer PFO Occluder & VSD
Cardia & VSD
Intrasept & VSD
Closure & VSD

Full Abstracts
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Your Company Name
Your Product Name & Your Company
AGA Medical
Amplatzer Septal Occluder & AGA

Cardiology; Study data from the United States shed light on cardiology research

Lead Author: [none given]

Life Science Weekly, 2007-09-18, pg. 3790

Study 2: Atrial septal defect closure in children under 15 kg can be successfully guided with intracardiac echocardiography.

According to recent research from the United States, "Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) is increasingly replacing transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) as the primary imaging technique to guide device closure of atrial septal defects (ASD). Owing to the length of the procedure, the use of TEE requires general anesthesia. Investigators have reported the usefulness of ICE in adults and children. However, little is known about the use of ICE in children whose weight is <15 kg."

"Therefore," wrote University of Chicago researchers A. Patel and colleagues, "this study examines the use of ICE guided secundum ASD closure in children<15 kg. Nineteen patients with a median age of 3.1 years (range 1.8-4.8), and median weight of 13.2 kg (range 8.0- 14.4) underwent tr! anscatheter occlusion (Amplatzer occluder) of a secundum ASD using ICE guidance. ICE was performed using an Acunav catheter. The ICE catheter (10 F shaft) was introduced into an 11 F sheath in a contralateral femoral vein. Diagnostic as well as periprocedure imaging was obtained."

"Sixteen patients had single, and three had multiple defects," the investigators found. "Median defect size as measured by ICE was 16 mm (range 2.5-25). The median balloon stretched diameter (obtained in eight patients) was 18 mm (range 10-21); the median size of the defect for these eight patients was 15 mm (range of 8- 20). Both techniques for measuring the defect correlated well with r=0.94. The ASD occluder size ranged from 7 to 26 mm with a median of 18 mm."

"The procedure was successful in 16 patients who had a device implanted and no residual shunt," they reported. "ASD occlusion was not attempted in two patients due to deficient r! ims and in one patient, the attempt failed due to left atrial disk pro lapse through the ASD. Four patients experienced transient complications during the catheter procedure, including supra ventricular tachycardia, sinus bradycardia, and two with complete heart block (resolving with device removal); all had subsequent successful device placement. No complications were attributed to the use of ICE and specifically, no vascular injury was noted."

The authors concluded, "Comparable to results with larger patients, ICE provides adequate imaging (preprocedure diagnosis and periprocedure guidance) during device occlusion of secundum ASDs with no significant complications. Thus, ICE can successfully be used in the closure of ASD in smaller patients (<15 kg) and eliminate the need for endotracheal intubation."

Patel and colleagues published their study in Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions (Intracardiac echocardiography to guide closure of atrial septal defects in children le! ss than 15 kilograms. Catheter Cardiovasc Interv, 2006;68(2):287-291).

For additional information, contact Z.M. Hijazi, University of Chicago, 5841 S Maryland Avenue, MC 4051, Chicago, IL 60637, USA.

MIB Abstract ID Number: 13910

Proquest Identifier: 1335192561

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Amplatzer PFO Occluder & AGA
Cardia
Intrasept PFO Closure System & Cardia
Intrasept ASD Closure System & Cardia
NMT Medical
STARFlex & NMT
CardioSEAL & NMT
BioSTAR & NMT
St Jude Medical
Premere PFO Closure System & St Jude
Atrial Septal Defect (ASD)

Total endoscopic repair of a pediatric atrial septal defect using the da Vinci robot and hypothermic fibrillation.

Lead Author: Baird CW

Additional Authors: Stamou SC, Skipper E, Watts L.

Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg, 2007-09-12, [Epub ahead of print]

Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, NC, USA.

Computerized robotic enhancement has recently emerged as promising technology to facilitate minimally invasive cardiac surgery. We report the first totally endoscopic closure of an atrial septal defect in a child using the da Vinci robot and hypothermic fibrillation. Keywords: Congenital heart disease; Robotic; Pediatric; Minimally invasive surgery; Myocardial protection; Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATs).

MIB Abstract ID Number: 13911

PreMedline Identifier: 17855414

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Angiology; Findings from Scotland, Italy and the United States broaden understanding of angiology

Lead Author: Zimarino, M

Health & Medicine Week., 2007-09-17, pg. 3583

Study 1: "Because clinicians require objectively demonstrable neurological deficits to confirm a diagnosis, the recognition of embolic events in the nervous system is generally restricted to the effects of ischemic necrosis produced by arterial occlusion. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has shown that lesser degrees of damage associated with small emboli are common, especially in the mid brain, and are usually clinically silent," investigators in Scotland report.

"They are frequently associated with atheromatous embolism in the elderly, but microembolic debris, such as fat, is common in the systemic venous return of healthy people and generally trapped in the microcirculation of the lung being removed by phagocytosis. However, pulmonary filtration may fail and microemboli may also pass through an atrial septal defect in so-called 'paradoxical' embolism. Studies of bubbles formed on decompression in diving have demonstrated the importance of pulmo! nary filtration in the protection of the nervous system and that filtration is size dependant, as small bubbles may escape entrapment. Fluid and even small solid emboli, arresting in or passing through the cerebral circulation, do not cause infarction, but disturb the blood-brain barrier inducing what has been termed the 'perivenous syndrome'. The nutrition of areas of the white matter of both the cerebral medulla and the spinal cord depends on long draining veins which have been shown to have surrounding capillary free zones. Because of the high oxygen extraction in the microcirculation of the gray matter of the central nervous system, the venous blood has low oxygen content. When this is reduced further by embolic events, tissue oxygenation may fall to critically low levels, leading to blood-brain barrier dysfunction, inflammation, demyelination and eventually, axonal damage. These are the hallmarks of the early lesions of multiple sclerosis where MR spectroscopy ! has also shown the presence of lactic acid. Significant elevation of t he venous oxygen tension requires oxygen to be provided under hyperbaric conditions. Arterial tension is typically increased ten-fold breathing oxygen at 2 atmospheres absolute (ATA), but this results in only a 1.5-fold increase in the cerebral venous oxygen tension," wrote P.B. James and colleagues, University of Dundee.

The researchers concluded: "The treatment of decompression sickness, and both animal and clinical studies, have confirmed the value of oxygen provided under hyperbaric conditions in the restoration and preservation of neurological function in the 'perivenous' syndrome."

James and colleagues published their study in Neurological Research (Research results from University of Dundee update understanding of angiology. Neurological Research, 2007;29(2):156- 161).

For additional information, contact P.B. James, University of Dundee, Wolfson Hyperbar Med Unit, Dundee, Scotland.

MIB Abstract ID Number: 13912

Proquest Identifier: 1335226361

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Study findings from Emory University, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery broaden understanding of atrioventricular septal defect in children

Lead Author: [none given]

Biotech Law Weekly, 2007-09-21, EXPANDED REPORTING; Pg. 498

Investigators publish new data in the report "What is the optimal time to repair atrioventricular septal defect and common atrioventricular valvar orifice. With improvements in technology and surgical technique, paediatric cardiologists are challenging surgeons to repair balanced atrioventricular septal defects in smaller patients. Early repair minimizes aggressive medical therapy to prevent heart failure, maintains growth, and limits exposure to elevated pulmonary pressures," researchers in the United States report.

"We compare the outcomes of repair among different-sized children. From December 2002 to July 2005, 92 patients underwent repair of an atrioventricular septal defect with common atrioventricular valvar orifice and balanced ventricles. We reviewed operative and postoperative data. We excluded patients weighing more than 10 kilograms, but included those who underwent concomitant closure of a patent oval foramen or atrial septal defect, or ligation of a patent arterial duct. Those requiring other concomitant procedures were excluded from the analysis. The median weight at repair was 4.9 kilograms, with a range from 2.93 to 7.9 kilograms, and the median age was 5.1 months, with a range from 0.39 to 9.6 months. Operative data included the time required for cardiopulmonary bypass, aortic cross-clamping, and the overall procedure. These times were not significantly affected by decreasing weight. Postoperative continuous data included duration of ventilation and length of intensive care unit and hospital stay. Stay in intensive care (p=0.006) and hospital (p=0.007) both increased significantly with decreasing weight. Postoperative categorical data included presence of residual ventricular septal defects, regurgitation across the left atrioventricular valve, and complications. While there was no difference in residual defects (p=0.166) or valvar regurgit! ation (p=0.729), there was a significantly higher presence of complica tions with decreasing weight (p=0.0043). There was no mortality, and no persistent heart block requiring placement of a permanent pacemaker," wrote B.E. Kogon and colleagues, Emory University, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery.

The researchers concluded: "Our data shows that, with the exception of a slightly longer and more complicated postoperative course, early surgery for symptomatic patients with atrioventricular septal defects and common atrioventricular valvar orifice can be undertaken safely and effectively in smaller children with excellent outcomes."

Kogon and colleagues published their study in Cardiology In the Young (What is the optimal time to repair atrioventricular septal defect and common atrioventricular valvar orifice? Cardiology In the Young, 2007;17(4):356-9).

For additional information, contact B.E. Kogon, Emory University, Dept. of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 USA..

Publisher contact information for the journ! al Cardiology In the Young is: Greenwich Medical Media Ltd., 137 Euston Rd., 4TH Floor, London NW1 2AA, England.

MIB Abstract ID Number: 13913

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NMT Medical & ASD
STARFlex & ASD
CardioSEAL & ASD
BioSTAR & ASD
AGA Medical & ASD
Amplatzer & ASD
Amplatzer Septal Occluder & ASD
Cardia & ASD
Intrasept & ASD
St Jude Medical & ASD
Premere PFO Closure System & ASD
Closure & ASD
Left Atrial Appendage

New echocardiography study results from T. Mráz et al described

Lead Author: [none given]

Medical Imaging Business Week, 2007-09-13, EXPANDED REPORTING; Pg. 119

Scientists discuss in "Role of echocardiography in percutaneous occlusion of the left atrial appendage" new findings in echocardiography. According to a study from Prague, Czech Republic, "Percutaneous occlusion of the left atrial appendage (LAA) is a modern alternative for the treatment of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and with a high risk of stroke who are not eligible for long-term anticoagulation therapy. Echocardiography plays a significant role in selecting patients, guiding the procedure, and in the post-procedural follow-up."

"AND MATERIALSXXXMETHODS] To test the role of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) in facilitating and shortening the procedure. ICE represents a more convenient approach in patients who are not under generally anesthesia and helps to facilitate transseptal puncture. On the other hand, TEE, having the ability to rotate the image plane, helps to better determine the position of the occ! luder. Echocardiographic guidance of this procedure is essential," wrote T. Mr áz and colleagues, .

The researchers concluded: "Which approach will be preferred will depend on the development of these two methods."

Mr áz and colleagues published the results of their research in Echocardiography (Role of echocardiography in percutaneous occlusion of the left atrial appendage. Echocardiography, 2007;24(4):401-4).

For additional information, contact T. Mr áz, Hospital Na Homolce, Dept. of Cardiology, Prague, Czech Republic.

The publisher of the journal Echocardiography can be contacted at: Blackwell Futura Publishing, Inc., 350 Main Street, Malden, MA 01248-5018, USA.

MIB Abstract ID Number: 13921

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New cardiology study results from Australia, Germany and the United States described

Lead Author: [none given]

Hospital Business Week, 2007-09-23, EXPANDED REPORTING; Pg. 937

Investigators in Australia, Germany and the United States have published new cardiology data.

Study 3: The second-generation atrial exclusion device enables rapid, reliable, and safe exclusion of the left atrial appendage.

"The left atrial appendage is a frequent source of thromboemboli in patients with atrial fibrillation. Exclusion of the left atrial appendage may reduce the risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. The atrial exclusion device, previously developed to perform left atrial appendage exclusion on a beating heart, was modified to accommodate different anatomic patterns of the human left atrial appendage and to ensure uniform pressure and occlusion," investigators in the United States report.

"The purpose of this study was to evaluate this second-generation atrial exclusion device during a midterm period in a canine model. Ten mongrel dogs (mean weight 28.9±4.6 kg) were used in this study. The! atrial exclusion device, constructed from two parallel and rigid titanium tubes and two nitinol springs with a knit-braided polyester fabric, was implanted at the base of the left atrial appendage through a left thoracotomy on a beating heart using a specially designed delivery tool," wrote K. Kamohara and colleagues, Cleveland Clinic.

They continued, "Dogs were evaluated at 30 days (n=4) and 90 days (n=6) by epicardial echocardiography, left atrial and coronary angiography, gross pathology, and histologic inspection. Device implantation was performed without complications in all dogs. Complete left atrial appendage exclusion without device migration or hemodynamic instability was confirmed, and there was no damage to the left circumflex artery or pulmonary artery. Macroscopic and microscopic assessments revealed favorable biocompatibility during midterm follow-up."

The researchers concluded, "The atrial exclusion device enabled rapi! d, reliable, and safe exclusion of the left atrial appendage. Clinical application may provide a new therapeutic option for reducing the risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation."

Kamohara and colleagues published their study in the Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (Evaluation of a novel device for left atrial appendage exclusion: The second-generation atrial exclusion device. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg, 2006;132(2):340-346).

For additional information, contact K. Fukamachi, Cleveland Clinic, Dept. of Biomedical Engineering ND20, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA.

MIB Abstract ID Number: 13926

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AGA Medical & LA Appendage
Amplatzer Vascular Plug & LA Appendage
Aritech & LA Appendage
Watchman Device & LA Appendage
Closure & LA Appendage
Patent Foramen Ovale (PFO)

Frequency and Significance of Cardiac Sources of Embolism in the TOAST Classification.

Lead Author: Han SW

Additional Authors: Nam HS, Kim SH, Lee JY, Lee KY, Heo JH.

Cerebrovasc Dis., 2007-09-19, 24(5):463-468 [Epub ahead of print]Click here to read

Department of Neurology, Sanggyepaik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Background: This study was aimed at determining the frequency and coexistent patterns of high- and medium-risk cardiac sources of embolism (CSE) as defined by the Trial of ORG 10172 in the Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) classification system and at investigating how identified CSE contributed to this classification. Methods: We analyzed data from 2,482 patients with acute cerebral infarctions who registered in the Yonsei Stroke Registry over a 10-year period. Cardiac sources were divided into high- and medium-risk groups based on the TOAST classification. Results: Of the 2,482 patients, 1,130 (46%) underwent echocardiographic studies. At least one CSE was detected in 629 patients (25%). Atrial fibrillation was the most common high-risk CSE. Patent foramen ovale, spontaneous echo contrast and congestive heart failure comprised most of the medium-risk CSE. Atrial fibrillation frequently accompanied coexistent CSE (69%) such as spontaneous echo contrast, congestive heart fail! ure, and left atrial/appendage thrombus, while patent foramen ovale was detected in isolation in more than 90% of the patients. Patients with a high-risk CSE were more likely to be diagnosed with cardioembolism (83%) than patients with only a medium-risk CSE (58%). Conclusions: Our study elucidated the frequency and various coexistent patterns of CSE in Korean stroke patients as defined by the TOAST classification system. In addition, we have demonstrated a higher correlation between high-risk CSE and cardioembolism than with medium-risk CSE and cardioembolism. Copyright (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

MIB Abstract ID Number: 13914

PreMedline Identifier: 17878729

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Data on fibrinolysis published by researchers at University Autonoma of Barcelona, Department of Neurology

Lead Author: [none given]

Biotech Business Week, 2007-09-17, EXPANDED REPORTING; Pg. 364

Research findings, "Patent foramen ovale and prothrombotic markers in young stroke patients," are discussed in a new report. According to recent research published in the journal Blood Coagulation and Fibrinolysis, "Patent foramen ovale (PFO) is more frequent in cryptogenic stroke patients than in the general population. The aim of this study was to determine prothrombotic markers regarding PFO in young cryptogenic stroke patients."

"We prospectively included consecutive cryptogenic stroke patients younger than 55 years. PFO was diagnosed with simultaneous transcranial Doppler and transesophageal echocardiography. We analyzed the following prothrombotic markers: antiphospholipid antibodies (APS), protein C and protein S deficiencies, factor V Leiden FVG1691A, prothrombin gene mutation PTG20210A and coagulation fact! or XII mutation FXIIC46T. From June 2005 to July 2006 we studied 39 patients, mean age 44.7 ±8.6 years, 48.7% men. PFO was detected in 17 patients (43.6%). We found no differences between PFO and non-PFO patients regarding prothrombotic markers: APS (p=0.851), protein S deficiency (p=0.851), protein C deficiency (p=0.249), FVG1691A (p=0.202), PTG20210A (p=0.401) or FXIIC46T (p=0.966). Female gender was the only variable related to prothrombotic markers, independent of PFO (p=0.001). The only prothrombotic marker related to PFO size (large PFO) was APS (p=0.043). Large PFO were also related to deep venous thrombosis (p=0.040) and atrial septal aneurysm (p=0.010)," wrote R. Belv ís and colleagues, University Autonoma of Barcelona, Department of Neurology.

The researchers concluded: "PFO patients do not present more prothrombotic markers than non-PFO patients, but APS are more frequent in large PFO."

Belv ís and colleagues published their study! in Blood Coagulation and Fibrinolysis (Patent foramen ovale and proth rombotic markers in young stroke patients. Blood Coagulation and Fibrinolysis, 2007;18(6):537-42).

For additional information, contact R. Belv ís, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Dept. of Neurology, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.

The publisher's contact information for the journal Blood Coagulation and Fibrinolysis is: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 530 Walnut St., Philadelphia, PA 19106-3621, USA.

MIB Abstract ID Number: 13915

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NMT Medical & PFO
STARFlex & PFO
BioSTAR & PFO
CardioSEAL & PFO
AGA Medical & PFO
Amplatzer & PFO
Amplatzer Septal Occluder & PFO
Amplatzer PFO Occluder & PFO
Cardia & PFO
Intrasept & PFO
St Jude Medical & PFO
Premere PFO Closure System & PFO
Closure & PFO
Stroke & Migraine
Ventricular Septal Defect (VSD)

Ventricular Septal Defects; Studies from I. Biyik et al have provided new data on ventricular septal defects

Lead Author: [none given]

Cardiovascular Week, 2007-09-17, pg. 225

2007 SEP 17 - (NewsRx.com) -- According to recent research from Usak, Turkey, "A rare case of Brucella pancarditis is reported in a 38-year-old male farmer who presented with heart failure. Brucella pancarditis was diagnosed with positive serology, and echocardiographic examination showed pericardial effusion, vegetation and mycotic aneurysms on the aortic root."

"The development of a fistula between the aorta and right ventricle, aortic dissection, a subaortic ventricular septal defect, and left ventricular pseudoaneurysm were observed. This case illustrates that life-threatening cardiac complications may develop, even under aggressive antibiotic therapy," wrote I. Biyik and colleagues.

The researchers concluded: "It is recommended that echocardiographic follow-up and close collaboration between colleagues working in infectious disease, cardiology and cardiovascular surgery are crucial in the treatment of Brucella pancarditis."

Biyik and colleagues pu! blished their study in the Journal of International Medical Research (Brucella pancarditis with dissecting aortic root abscess, left ventricular pseudoaneurysm and ventricular septal defect. Journal of International Medical Research, 2007;35(3):422-426).

For additional information, contact I. Biyik, Ismetpasa Caddesi 75-1, TR-64100 Usak, Turkey.

Publisher contact information for the Journal of International Medical Research is: Cambridge Med Publ, Wicker House, High St., Worthing BN11 1DJ, W Sussex, England.

MIB Abstract ID Number: 13918

Proquest Identifier: 1335203331

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Researchers from GlaxoSmithKline provide details of new studies and findings in the area of congenital heart defects

Lead Author: [none given]

Lab Law Weekly, 2007-09-21, EXPANDED REPORTING; Pg. 240

New investigation results, "The utility of the general practice research database to examine selected congenital heart defects: a validation study," are detailed in a study published in Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety. "The purpose of this research was (1) to validate that ventricular septal defect (VSD), tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), and coarctation of the aorta (COA) can be studied in the UK General practice research database (GPRD) and (2) to understand which of the available GPRD components (computerized medical records, questionnaires, and maternal/infant free text) provide maximal information about these heart defects. Using a practitioner questionnaire, the positive predictive value (PPV) of the computerized medical record for VSD, TOF, and COA were determined," scientists writing in the journal Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety report.

"Both infant and maternal free text was e! xamined. Concordance between the infant free text information and questionnaires was calculated. The proportion of infant information captured in the maternal free text was determined. A 93% response rate was achieved. Based on questionnaire responses, an overall PPV of 93.5% was achieved (VSD=95%, TOF=90%, COA=100%). Approximately half of the records contained infant free text information including information on the type and size of VSD, echocardiogram findings, and surgery. Concordance between the infant's free text and questionnaire information occurred in most of the cases (92-100%). The proportion of infant information in the maternal free text was low (4-19%). The GPRD computerized medical records are sufficient to assess VSD, TOF, and COA. This study confirms that maternal free text provides a low yield of limited information pertaining to the infants' defect, while the infant free text may provide an additional information usually obtainable from practition! er questionnaires," wrote K.E. Wurst and colleagues, GlaxoSmithKline.< /p>

The researchers concluded: "The information provided by an infant free text may limit the need for practitioner questionnaire validation."

Wurst and colleagues published their study in Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety (The utility of the general practice research database to examine selected congenital heart defects: a validation study. Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety, 2007;16(8):867-77).

Additional information can be obtained by contacting K.E. Wurst, Worldwide Epidemiology, GlaxoSmithKline, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 USA..

The publisher of the journal Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety can be contacted at: John Wiley & Sons Ltd., the Atrium, Southern Gate, Chichester PO19 8SQ, W Sussex, England.

MIB Abstract ID Number: 13919

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Severe Ebstein's Anomaly Can Benefit From a Small Ventricular Septal Defect: Two Cases.

Lead Author: Del Pasqua A

Additional Authors: de Zorzi A, Sanders SP, Rinelli G.

Pediatr Cardiol, 2007-09-14, [Epub ahead of print]

Cardiology Department, Università degli Studi di Siena, Siena, Italy.

Ebstein's anomaly is a rare congenital heart defect. Associated lesions are uncommon, and the mortality rates can be as high as 54% during the first month of life. Two cases of severe Ebstein's anomaly with ventricular septal defect are described. It is speculated that this rare association, allowing adequate forward pulmonary blood flow in the neonate, permitted the reported patients to survive the neonatal period, which is the most life-threatening time. The authors propose that the presence of a small ventricular septal defect can be beneficial for such patients, averting the need for surgery during early infancy when the risk is highest.

MIB Abstract ID Number: 13920

PreMedline Identifier: 17874154

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NMT Medical & VSD
STARFlex & VSD
CardioSEAL & VSD
AGA Medical & VSD
Amplatzer & VSD
Amplatzer Septal Occluder & VSD

Transcatheter closure of perimembranous ventricular septal defects: early and long-term results.

Lead Author: Butera G

Additional Authors: Carminati M, Chessa M, Piazza L, Micheletti A, Negura DG, Abella R, Giamberti A, Frigiola A.

J Am Coll Cardiol, 2007-09-18, 50(12):1189-95. Epub 2007 Sep 4.

Department of Pediatric Cardiology and GUCH Unit, Policlinico San Donato, Instituto Ricerca e Cura a Carattere Scientifico, San Donato Milanese, Italy. gianfra.but@lycos.com

OBJECTIVES: We sought to analyze safety, efficacy, and follow-up results of percutaneous closure of perimembranous ventricular septal defects (pmVSD). BACKGROUND: Results of pmVSD transcatheter closure have been reported in the literature; however, follow-up data are still limited. METHODS: Between January 1999 and June 2006, 104 patients underwent percutaneous closure of a pmVSD at our institution. An Amplatzer VSD device (muscular or eccentric) (AGA Medical Corp., Golden Valley, Minnesota) was used in all subjects. RESULTS: The mean age at closure was 14 years (range 0.6 to 63 years). The attempt to place a device was successful in 100 patients (96.2%). The median device size used was 8 mm (range 4 to 16 mm). No deaths occurred. Total occlusion rate was 47% at completion of the procedure, rising to 84% at discharge and 99% during the follow-up. A total of 13 early complications occurred (11.5%), but in all but 2 subjects (1.9%) these were transient. The median follow-up ! was 38.5 months. The most significant complication was complete atrioventricular block (cAVB), which required pacemaker implantation in 6 subjects (5.7%; 2 in the early phase and 4 during the follow-up). Cox proportional hazards regression analysis showed that the only variable significantly associated with the occurrence of this complication was age at the time of the procedure (p = 0.028; relative risk 0.25). All subjects experiencing this problem were <6 years old. CONCLUSIONS: In the current era and in experienced hands, pmVSD closure can be performed safely and successfully. The major concern is the occurrence of cAVB; therefore, very careful monitoring of rhythm is mandatory during follow-up.

MIB Abstract ID Number: 13909

PreMedline Identifier: 17868812

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Amplatzer PFO Occluder & VSD
Cardia & VSD
Intrasept & VSD
Closure & VSD
 

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